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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
. >> name one person who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the u.s. senate. >>he use of intimition -- i should have used influence. >> he could not name one person publicly. this is gamesmanship of the first order. you have conversations with plenty of members of congress and they feel one way about some of the issues in the middle east, that they simply cannot move an inch on issues involving israel. >> is he in command of the issues? >> i dnot think anybody would have come off well. i think it was a halting performance by chuck hagel, and chuck hagel underline what nina said earlier, not a burbling- nimble person. not a guy that is known for sound bites, not somebody that you would go to for a quotation on deadlines. he would give the thought of context or any answer he would give -- >> god forbid. [laughter] >> more than anything else, i could not get over the badger and quality. yes or no. yes or no, senator. john mccain was looking for vindication for the surge. chuck hagel was not going to give it to him. >> john mccain is not the issue, it is chuck hagel. his problem is not some
." but the cash-strapped u.s. postal service will eliminate mail delivery on saturdays. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we talk with postmaster general patrick donahoe. >> brown: then, president obama picks r.e.i. executive sally jewell to run the interior department. we look at how the cabinet is shaping up with many posts yet to fill. >> ifill: we have two stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
led her to create the post of u.s. ambassador for global women's issues. she appointed melanne verveer, a long-time aide and friend. >> well, you know, as first lady she had impact on our own policies. it was she who very much became a proponent for micro credit for women who were in the poorest circumstances being lifted up with training and small amounts of credit. girls' education. so she ha pli impacts certainly in development during those years. as senator she continued to be active on those issues. the work that went on with afghan women early in 2003 recognizing how critical they would be to the creation of a better future for afghan women. she was very involved in when she traveled as a senator. she didn't travel that much internationally, but when she did, to afghanistan or to iraq, she met wit all of theey peop, but she always asked that she also meet with some of the key women. and then as secretary, she really made these issues a cornerstone of our foreign policy, obviously, in creating the position that i have, which is the first ever u.s. ambassador for global women's iss
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
in cyberspace. >> it is costing hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of u.s. jobs every year. >> counterterrorism expert who worked under the reagan administration, both the bushes, president clinton. the pit cyber warfare they're waiting on the united states and have been doing it for years. who has been minding the store? >> there was a bill that had been agreed to on some cybersecurity and, you may recall, that the privacy aficionado's went bonkers it is it bananas' and bonkers together. they flooded their members of congress and and it did not pass anything. meanwhile, there is not a serious person in washington of any ideology who has not known with increasing power that this is a problem. the president said he will use his executive powers to do it and for all these people on the internet, this is just like a range and there can be no regulation whatsoever. it will come back to haunt us. >> we have this huge defense establishment and we have a place in maryland where they're supposed to know about this. >> it raises a strategic question we have now really thought throug
days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. onomy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so i'm pleased to have
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)